UGA Extension Office

Home

Welcome to Dougherty County Cooperative Extension

University of Georgia Cooperative Extension in Dougherty County provides a variety of educational programs and client services to the residents of our county.  We are dedicated to helping people find answers to questions related to the following areas

UGA Extension is a statewide educational organization funded by federal, state and local governments that brings research-based education directly to individuals, families and communities.

Through a partnership between Dougherty County and UGA Extension, current unbiased research-based information is provided to our community. We invite you to contact us at (229) 436-7216 or visit our office at 125 Pine Avenue in Downtown Albany.


If you have questions about ... 

Nutrition, ServSafe, Healthy Eating, Weight Loss, Canning, Cooking for Large Groups, Stain Removal, Finances, Credit, Your Home Safety, Recipes, Decorating, Sewing, Crafts or Diabetes

 

Home Lawns, Farming, Flower Gardening, Landscaping, Crops, Ponds, Vegetable Gardening, Master Gardeners, Plant Diseases, Insects or Trees

 

4-H Club, Summer Camp, Summer Classes, Project Achievement, or Youth Competitions


Contact ... at (229) 436-7216

Suzanne Williams

 

 

 

James Morgan

 

 

Jazmin Thomas


Upcoming Classes being offered...

To sign up for any classes with us call (229) 436-7216 to register

All of our classes require pre-registration.
If there is a materials fee, please make check or money order payable to:
Dougherty County Extension and send to:

Dougherty County Cooperative Extension
125 Pine Ave., Suite 100
Albany, GA 31701-2545

CONTACT US!


Upcoming Events


  • Mar 21
  • 6:00 PM | Manchester, GA
  • This meeting will be an informal one giving producers the opportunity to ask Dr. Whitley about any concerns that they have regarding management on their farms. Topics already presented that will be discussed are CDT vaccinations, prevention of Coccidiosis and mineral supplementation, especially copper, for parasite management.
  • Mar 25-Mar 26
  • Kathleen, GA
  • 4-H Members in 4th-6th grades will compete for honors in their project area of interest. Youth sign up at their County Extension 4-H Office in early fall to develop his/her project and prepare for the competition. There are over 50 projects to choose from. Youth learn powerful research, writing and oral presentation skills. Youth may also choose to compete in a performing arts project (singing, dancing) or demonstrate culinary skills in a foods lab project.
See More Events

Extension Publications


  • Your Household Water Quality: Odors in Your Water (C 1016)
  • Homeowners sometimes experience unpleasant odors in their household water. In many cases, the exact cause of the odor is difficult to determine by water testing; however, this publication provides a few general recommendations for treating some common causes of household water odors.
  • Read More

  • Native Plants for Georgia Part I: Trees, Shrubs and Woody Vines (B 987)
  • This publication focuses on native trees, shrubs and woody vines for Georgia. It is not our intent to describe all native species — just those available in the nursery trade and those that the authors feel have potential for nursery production and landscape use. Rare or endangered species are not described. Information on each plant is provided according to the following categories: Common Name(s)/Botanical Name/Family, Characteristics, Landscape Uses, Size, Zones and Habitat.
  • Read More

  • Conversion Tables, Formulas and Suggested Guidelines for Horticultural Use (B 931)
  • Pesticide and fertilizer recommendations are often made on a pounds per acre and tons per acre basis. While these may be applicable to field production of many crops, orchardists, nurserymen and greenhouse operators often must convert these recommendations to smaller areas, such as row feet, square feet, or even per tree or per pot. Thus pints, cups, ounces, tablespoons and teaspoons are the common units of measure. The conversion is frequently complicated by metric units of measure. This publication is designed to aid growers in making these calculations and conversions, and also provides other data useful in the management, planning and operation of horticultural enterprises.
  • Read More

  • Vegetable Garden Calendar (C 943)
  • The recommendations in this circular are based on long-term average dates of the last killing frost in the spring and first killing frost in the fall. Every year does not conform to the "average," so you should use your own judgment about advancing or delaying the time for each job, depending on weather conditions.
  • Read More

Search other publications

Extension News



    • Container herbs
    • Published 2/16/2017 by Norman Winter
    • Herbs can provide flavor to dishes and color, texture to container gardens.
    • Read More

    • Arbor Day
    • Published 2/16/2017 by Merritt Melancon
    • For Georgians looking to plant trees the time is now; Georgia's Arbor Day is on Feb. 17
    • Read More

    • Healthy Trees
    • Published 2/16/2017 by Merritt Melancon
    • Common lawn herbicides can cause lasting damage to landscape trees if not used carefully.
    • Read More

    • Post Valentine's Day
    • Published 2/15/2017 by Keishon Thomas
    • Invest time in your relationships all year long, not just on designated days.
    • Read More

    • Cotton Equipment Donation
    • Published 2/14/2017 by Clint Thompson
    • Funston Gin provided UGA's C.M. Stripling Irrigation Research Park with a module builder and boll buggy to help with cotton harvest.
    • Read More

    • Irrigation Maintenance
    • Published 2/14/2017 by Julia Rodriguez
    • Leaky pipes, flat tires and damaged sprinklers are all problems that could impact production during growing season.
    • Read More

    • Hometown Tea
    • Published 2/6/2017 by Merritt Melancon
    • Locally grown tea could soon be steeping in coffee houses and on kitchen tables.
    • Read More

    • Early Risers
    • Published 2/9/2017 by Norman Winter
    • You say "narcissus," I say "daffodil." We all say "spring!"
    • Read More